Meet the Hematology Support Center (HSC) Team

We're a dedicated team to help patients who have been prescribed Takeda hematology products. We can provide information, guidance, and resources regarding their treatment.

Tap to learn about each team member

  • case-manager-icon

    Case Managers (CMs)

  • healthcare-educator

    Healthcare Educators (HCEs)

  • pam

    Patient Access Managers (PAMs)*

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Case Managers (CMs)

As your first point of contact, Takeda CMs can:

  • Assist with your HSC enrollment
  • Help you enroll in Takeda's HSC CoPay Assistance Program (if you're eligible)
  • Connect you to other HSC team members for more information
healthcare-educator

Healthcare Educators (HCEs)

Your HCE provides you with health education support. HCEs can:

  • Provide one-on-one education about your condition and prescribed Takeda treatment
  • Connect you with community resources and other tools to help support you
  • Provide you with assistance in Spanish, if needed
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Patient Access Managers (PAMs)*

Your PAM is an insurance expert who is trained to help you address potential access challenges with your prescribed Takeda treatment. PAMs can:

  • Provide insurance and access education tools
  • Help answer questions about insurance access and coverage
  • Address complex coverage issues, such as if you experience a loss or lapse in your insurance coverage

*PAMs were previously named Reimbursement and Access Managers (RAMs).

Sign up for support that best fits your needs.

After you submit the HSC enrollment form, an HSC team member will contact you if more information is needed.

Get personalized product support and information about financial assistance options. There are 3 easy ways to self-enroll:

Option 1

Enroll online—Get started

What Takeda treatment are you prescribed?

Make selection.

Please select your treatment to continue.

Other ways you can
enroll to get HSC support

Option 2

Enroll by phone

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Simply call us. An HSC Case Manager can help you enroll.

1-888-229-83791-888-229-8379, Monday through Friday, 8:30 AM to 8:00 PM ET.

Option 3

Enroll by mail or fax

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Download the HSC enrollment form. Fill out as much information as you can. If you cannot complete all fields, call HSC at 1-888-229-83791-888-229-8379. A Case Manager can help you with any questions you may have. Sign the form, then mail or fax it back to us. The address and fax number are provided on the form.

Hematology Support Center (HSC)

Frequently asked questions

Who can I call at HSC if I have questions?

If you are prescribed a Takeda hematology treatment, HSC Case Managers (CMs) are available to assist you. CMs can answer your questions or connect you to other team members. To speak with a CM, call us Monday through Friday, 8:30 AM to 8:00 PM ET, at 1-888-229-83791-888-229-8379.

Can I pick and choose the type(s) of product support that I receive from HSC?

If you are prescribed a Takeda hematology treatment, you can enroll in HSC. When you enroll, you're free to choose the type of product support that best fits your needs. And you can always change this in the future.

Learn more about enrolling in HSC here.

I'm having trouble deciding which insurance plan is right for me. How can HSC help me?

If you are prescribed a Takeda hematology treatment, HSC Patient Access Managers (PAMs)* can help you choose an insurance plan. To connect with a PAM, call HSC Monday through Friday, 8:30 AM to 8:00 PM ET, at 1-888-229-83791-888-229-8379.

This website also offers tools and information to help you understand insurance. You'll learn how to compare plans, ask the right questions, and choose a plan that fits your needs. You can find these HSC resources here.

*PAMs were previously named Reimbursement and Access Managers (RAMs).

Does HSC offer support in a language other than English?

The HSC team includes Healthcare Educators (HCEs) who can help educate you on your condition and your prescribed Takeda treatment. HCEs can also provide assistance to you in Spanish, if needed.

Learn more about HCEs and how to request HCE support here.

My insurance is changing. Will this affect my access to my prescribed Takeda treatment?

If you are prescribed a Takeda hematology treatment and have questions or concerns about a change in your insurance coverage, HSC is here to help. Our Patient Access Managers (PAMs)* can help you find the answers that you need. To connect with a PAM, you can call HSC Monday through Friday, 8:30 AM to 8:00 PM ET, at 1-888-229-83791-888-229-8379.

Learn more about PAM support here.

*PAMs were previously named Reimbursement and Access Managers (RAMs).

ADVATE® [Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant)] Important Information

What is ADVATE?

  • ADVATE is a medicine used to replace clotting factor (factor VIII or antihemophilic factor) that is missing in people with hemophilia A (also called "classic" hemophilia).
  • ADVATE is used to prevent and control bleeding in adults and children (0-16 years) with hemophilia A. Your healthcare provider (HCP) may give you ADVATE when you have surgery.
  • ADVATE can reduce the number of bleeding episodes in adults and children (0-16 years) when used regularly (prophylaxis).

ADVATE is not used to treat von Willebrand disease.

DETAILED IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION

Who should not use ADVATE?

Do not use ADVATE if you:

  • Are allergic to mice or hamsters.
  • Are allergic to any ingredients in ADVATE.

Tell your HCP if you are pregnant or breastfeeding because ADVATE may not be right for you.

What should I tell my HCP before using ADVATE?

Tell your HCP if you:

  • Have or have had any medical problems.
  • Take any medicines, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, such as over-the-counter medicines, supplements or herbal remedies
  • Have any allergies, including allergies to mice or hamsters.
  • Are breastfeeding. It is not known if ADVATE passes into your milk and if it can harm your baby.
  • Are or become pregnant. It is not known if ADVATE may harm your unborn baby.
  • Have been told that you have inhibitors to factor VIII (because ADVATE may not work for you).

What important information do I need to know about ADVATE?

  • You can have an allergic reaction to ADVATE. Call your HCP right away and stop treatment if you get a rash or hives, itching, tightness of the throat, chest pain or tightness, difficulty breathing, lightheadedness, dizziness, nausea or fainting.
  • Do not attempt to infuse yourself with ADVATE unless you have been taught by your HCP or hemophilia center.

What else should I know about ADVATE and Hemophilia A?

  • Your body may form inhibitors to factor VIII. An inhibitor is part of the body's normal defense system. If you form inhibitors, it may stop ADVATE from working properly. Talk with your HCP to make sure you are carefully monitored with blood tests for the development of inhibitors to factor VIII.

What are possible side effects of ADVATE?

  • Side effects that have been reported with ADVATE include: cough, headache, joint swelling/aching, sore throat, fever, itching, unusual taste, dizziness, hematoma, abdominal pain, hot flashes, swelling of legs, diarrhea, chills, runny nose/congestion, nausea/vomiting, sweating, and rash. Tell your HCP about any side effects that bother you or do not go away or if your bleeding does not stop after taking ADVATE.

Please click here for ADVATE full Prescribing Information and discuss with your HCP.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit https://www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

ADYNOVATE® [Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant), PEGylated] Important Information

What is ADYNOVATE?

  • ADYNOVATE is an injectable medicine that is used to help treat and control bleeding in children and adults with hemophilia A (congenital Factor VIII deficiency).
  • Your healthcare provider (HCP) may give you ADYNOVATE when you have surgery.
  • ADYNOVATE can reduce the number of bleeding episodes when used regularly (prophylaxis).

ADYNOVATE is not used to treat von Willebrand disease.

DETAILED IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION

Who should not use ADYNOVATE?

Do not use ADYNOVATE if you:

  • Are allergic to mice or hamster protein
  • Are allergic to any ingredients in ADYNOVATE or ADVATE [Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant)]

Tell your HCP if you are pregnant or breastfeeding because ADYNOVATE may not be right for you.

What should I tell my HCP before using ADYNOVATE?

Tell your HCP if you:

  • Have or have had any medical problems.
  • Take any medicines, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, such as over-the-counter medicines, supplements or herbal remedies.
  • Have any allergies, including allergies to mice or hamsters.
  • Are breastfeeding. It is not known if ADYNOVATE passes into your milk and if it can harm your baby.
  • Are or become pregnant. It is not known if ADYNOVATE may harm your unborn baby.
  • Have been told that you have inhibitors to factor VIII (because ADYNOVATE may not work for you).

What important information do I need to know about ADYNOVATE?

  • You can have an allergic reaction to ADYNOVATE. Call your healthcare provider right away and stop treatment if you get a rash or hives, itching, tightness of the throat, chest pain or tightness, difficulty breathing, lightheadedness, dizziness, nausea or fainting.
  • Do not attempt to infuse yourself with ADYNOVATE unless you have been taught by your HCP or hemophilia center.

What else should I know about ADYNOVATE and Hemophilia A?

  • Your body may form inhibitors to factor VIII. An inhibitor is part of the body's normal defense system. If you form inhibitors, it may stop ADYNOVATE from working properly. Talk with your HCP to make sure you are carefully monitored with blood tests for the development of inhibitors to factor VIII.

What are possible side effects of ADYNOVATE?

  • The common side effects of ADYNOVATE are headache and nausea. These are not all the possible side effects with ADYNOVATE. Tell your HCP about any side effects that bother you or do not go away.

Please click here for ADYNOVATE full Prescribing Information and discuss with your HCP.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit https://www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

FEIBA® [Anti-Inhibitor Coagulant Complex] Indications and Detailed Important Risk Information for Patients

What is FEIBA?

FEIBA is an Anti-Inhibitor Coagulant Complex approved for use in hemophilia A and B patients with inhibitors for:

  • Control and prevention of bleeding episodes
  • Use around the time of surgery
  • Routine prophylaxis to prevent or reduce the frequency of bleeding episodes

FEIBA is NOT for use in the treatment of bleeding episodes resulting from coagulation factor deficiencies without inhibitors to factor VIII or factor IX.

DETAILED IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION

WARNING: EVENTS INVOLVING CLOTS THAT BLOCK BLOOD VESSELS

  • Blood clots that block blood vessels and their effects have been reported during post-marketing surveillance following infusion of FEIBA, particularly following administration of high doses (above 200 units per kg per day) and/or in patients at risk for forming blood clots.
  • If you experience any of these side effects, call your doctor right away.

Who should not use FEIBA?

You should not use FEIBA if:

  • You had a previous severe allergic reaction to the product
  • You have Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC), or signs of small blood vessel clots throughout the body
  • You have sudden blood vessel clots or blocked blood vessels, (such as, heart attack or stroke)

What other important information should I know about FEIBA?

Events involving blood clots blocking blood vessels (such as blood clot in vein, blood clot in the lung, heart attack, and stroke) can occur with FEIBA, particularly after receiving high doses (above 200 units per kg per day) and/or in patients with risk factors for clotting.

At first sign or symptom of a sudden blood vessel clot or blocked blood vessel (such as chest pain or pressure, shortness of breath, fever, altered consciousness, vision, or speech, limb or abdomen swelling and/or pain), stop FEIBA administration right away and seek immediate emergency medical treatment.

Infusion of FEIBA should not exceed a single dose of 100 units per kg body weight and daily doses of 200 units per kg of body weight. Maximum injection or infusion rate must not exceed 2 units per kg of body weight per minute.

The safety and efficacy of FEIBA for breakthrough bleeding in patients receiving emicizumab has not been established. Events of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), a condition where blood clots and damage occur in small blood vessels, were reported in an emicizumab (Hemlibra®) clinical trial where patients received FEIBA with emicizumab as part of a treatment plan for breakthrough bleeding. If you are on emicizumab and are taking or anticipate taking FEIBA for a breakthrough bleeding episode, tell your doctor immediately because there are specific safety considerations and you must be closely monitored by your hemophilia treater or treatment center.

Allergic reactions, including severe, sometimes fatal allergic reactions that can involve the whole body, can occur following the infusion of FEIBA. Stop using FEIBA promptly and call your doctor or get emergency treatment right away if you get a rash, hives or welts, experience itching, tightness of the throat, vomiting, abdominal pain, chest pain or tightness, difficulty breathing, lightheadedness, dizziness, nausea or fainting.

Because FEIBA is made from human plasma it may carry a risk of transmitting infectious agents, such as viruses, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and, theoretically, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD).

What are the possible side effects of FEIBA?

The most common side effects observed during the prophylaxis clinical study were low number of red blood cells, diarrhea, bleeding into a joint, positive test for hepatitis B surface antibodies, nausea, and vomiting.

The serious side effects seen with FEIBA are allergic reactions and clotting events involving blockage of blood vessels, which include stroke, blockage of the main blood vessel to the lung, and deep vein blood clots.

Call your doctor right away about any side effects that bother you during or after you stop taking FEIBA.

What other medications might interact with FEIBA?

Talk with your doctor about the possibility of formation of blood clots when taking drugs that may prevent clot breakdown such as tranexamic acid, and aminocaproic acid. There have not been adequate studies of the use of FEIBA and rFVIIa (NovoSeven®), or emicizumab together, or one after the other. Use of drugs that may prevent clot breakdown within approximately 6 to 12 hours after the administration of FEIBA is not recommended.

Please click here for FEIBA full Prescribing Information, including BOXED WARNING on blood clots, and discuss with your doctor.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit https://www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

HEMOFIL M [Antihemophilic Factor (Human), Method M, Monoclonal Purified] Important Information

What is HEMOFIL M?

  • HEMOFIL M is a prescription medicine used to replace clotting factor (factor VIII or antihemophilic factor) that is missing in people with hemophilia A (also called "classic" hemophilia).
  • HEMOFIL M is used to prevent and control bleeding in people with hemophilia A.

HEMOFIL M is not used to treat von Willebrand disease.

DETAILED IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION

Who should not use HEMOFIL M?

Do not use HEMOFIL M if you:

  • Are allergic to any ingredients in HEMOFIL M.
  • Are allergic to mice.

Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or breastfeeding because HEMOFIL M may not be right for you.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before using HEMOFIL M?

Tell your healthcare provider if you:

  • Have or have had any medical problems
  • Take any medicines, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, such as over-the-counter medicines, supplements or herbal remedies.
  • Have any allergies, including allergies to mice.
  • Are breastfeeding. It is not known if HEMOFIL M passes into your milk and if it can harm your baby.
  • Are or become pregnant. It is not known if HEMOFIL M may harm your unborn baby.
  • Have been told that you have inhibitors to factor VIII (because HEMOFIL M may not work for you).

What important information do I need to know about HEMOFIL M?

  • Allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis, have been reported with HEMOFIL M. The symptoms of an allergic reaction may include wheezing, difficulty breathing, low blood pressure, lightheadedness, dizziness, fainting, chest tightness or pain, facial swelling, hives, rash, flushing, itching or nausea. If you experience any of these symptoms, stop using HEMOFIL M and call your healthcare provider right away.
  • Because HEMOFIL M is made from human blood, it may carry a risk of transmitting infectious agents, such as parvovirus B19, hepatitis A, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent. Symptoms of parvovirus B19 infection include fever, drowsiness, chills, and runny nose followed about two weeks later by a rash and joint pain. Symptoms of hepatitis A may include several days to weeks of poor appetite, tiredness, and low-grade fever followed by nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, dark urine, and a yellowed complexion. Discontinue use of HEMOFIL M and contact your healthcare provider right away if such symptoms occur. Any infections your doctor thinks may have been transmitted by this product should be reported to Shire Drug Safety (Baxalta-related products) at 1-800-999-1785 (in the U.S.).

What else should I know about HEMOFIL M and Hemophilia A?

  • Your body may form inhibitors to factor VIII. An inhibitor is part of the body's normal defense system. If you form inhibitors, it may stop HEMOFIL M from working properly. Talk with your healthcare provider to make sure you are carefully monitored with blood tests for the development of inhibitors to factor VIII.

What are possible side effects of HEMOFIL M?

  • The most common side effects reported during clinical studies with HEMOFIL M include: Factor VIII inhibitors, dizziness, headache, unusual taste, fever, and infusion site inflammation. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effects that bother you or do not go away or if your bleeding does not stop after taking HEMOFIL M.

Please click here for HEMOFIL M full Prescribing Information and discuss with your HCP.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit https://www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

RECOMBINATE [Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant)] Important Information

What is RECOMBINATE?

  • RECOMBINATE is a prescription medicine used to replace clotting factor (factor VIII or antihemophilic factor) that is missing in people with hemophilia A (also called "classic" hemophilia).
  • RECOMBINATE is used to prevent and control bleeding in people with hemophilia A. Your healthcare provider (HCP) may give you RECOMBINATE when you have surgery.

RECOMBINATE is not used to treat von Willebrand disease.

DETAILED IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION

Who should not use RECOMBINATE?

Do not use RECOMBINATE if you:

  • Are allergic to mouse, hamster, or bovine proteins.
  • Are allergic to any ingredients in RECOMBINATE.

Tell your HCP if you are pregnant or breastfeeding because RECOMBINATE may not be right for you.

What should I tell my HCP before using RECOMBINATE?

Tell your HCP if you:

  • Have or have had any medical problems.
  • Take any medicines, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, such as over-the-counter medicines, supplements or herbal remedies.
  • Have any allergies, including allergies to mouse, hamster, or bovine proteins.
  • Are breastfeeding. It is not known if RECOMBINATE passes into your milk and if it can harm your baby.
  • Are or become pregnant. It is not known if RECOMBINATE may harm your unborn baby.
  • Have been told that you have inhibitors to factor VIII (because RECOMBINATE may not work for you).

What important information do I need to know about RECOMBINATE?

  • You could have an allergic reaction to RECOMBINATE. Symptoms of an allergic reaction may include rash or hives, itching, tightness of the throat, chest pain or tightness, difficulty breathing, lightheadedness, dizziness, or fainting. If you experience any of these symptoms, stop using RECOMBINATE and call your HCP right away.

What else should I know about RECOMBINATE and Hemophilia A?

  • Your body may form inhibitors to factor VIII. An inhibitor is part of the body's normal defense system. If you form inhibitors, it may stop RECOMBINATE from working properly. Talk with your HCP to make sure you are carefully monitored with blood tests for the development of inhibitors to factor VIII.

What are possible side effects of RECOMBINATE?

  • The most common side effects reported during clinical studies with RECOMBINATE include: chills, flushing, rash, and nose bleeds. Tell your HCP about any side effects that bother you or do not go away or if your bleeding does not stop after taking RECOMBINATE.

Please click here for RECOMBINATE full Prescribing Information and discuss with your HCP.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit https://www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

RIXUBIS® [Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant)] Important Information

What is RIXUBIS?

RIXUBIS is an injectable medicine used to replace clotting factor IX that is missing in adults and children with hemophilia B (also called congenital factor IX deficiency or Christmas disease).

RIXUBIS is used to control and prevent bleeding in people with hemophilia B. Your healthcare provider may give you RIXUBIS when you have surgery. RIXUBIS can reduce the number of bleeding episodes when used regularly (prophylaxis).

DETAILED IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION

Who should not use RIXUBIS?

You should not use RIXUBIS if you:

  • are allergic to hamsters
  • are allergic to any ingredients in RIXUBIS

Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or breastfeeding because RIXUBIS may not be right for you.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before using RIXUBIS?

You should tell your healthcare provider if you

  • have or have had any medical problems
  • take any medicines, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, such as over-the-counter medicines, supplements or herbal remedies
  • have any allergies, including allergies to hamsters.
  • are breastfeeding. It is not known if RIXUBIS passes into your milk and if it can harm your baby
  • are pregnant or planning to become pregnantIt is not known if RIXUBIS may harm your unborn baby
  • have been told that you have inhibitors to factor IX (because RIXUBIS may not work for you)

What are the possible side effects of RIXUBIS?

Allergic reactions may occur with RIXUBIS. Call your healthcare provider or get emergency treatment right away if you get a rash or hives, itching, tightness of the throat, chest pain or tightness, difficulty breathing, lightheadedness, dizziness, nausea, or fainting.

Some common side effects of RIXUBIS were unusual taste in the mouth and limb pain.

Tell your healthcare provider about any side effects that bother you or do not go away.

Your body may form inhibitors to factor IX. An inhibitor is part of the body's defense system. If you form inhibitors, it may stop RIXUBIS from working properly. Consult with your healthcare provider to make sure you are carefully monitored with blood tests for development of inhibitors to factor IX.

Please click here for RIXUBIS full Prescribing Information and discuss with your HCP.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit https://www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

VONVENDI® [von Willebrand factor (recombinant)] Important Information

What is VONVENDI?

VONVENDI is used in adults (age 18 years and older) diagnosed with von Willebrand disease to:

  • treat and control bleeding episodes
  • prevent excessive bleeding during and after surgery

DETAILED IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION

Who should not use VONVENDI?

You should not use VONVENDI if you:

  • Are allergic to any ingredients in VONVENDI.
  • Are allergic to mice or hamsters.

Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or breastfeeding because VONVENDI may not be right for you.

How should I use VONVENDI?

Your first dose of VONVENDI for each bleeding episode may be administered with a recombinany factor VIII as instructed by your healthcare provider.

Your healthcare provider will instruct you whether additional doses of VONVENDI with or without recombinant factor VIII are needed.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before I use VONVENDI?

You should tell your healthcare provider if you:

  • Have or have had any medical problems.
  • Take any medicines, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, such as over-the-counter medicines, supplements or herbal remedies.
  • Have any allergies, including allergies to mice or hamsters.
  • Are breastfeeding. It is not known if VONVENDI passes into your milk and if it can harm your baby.
  • Are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. It is not known if VONVENDI can harm your unborn baby.
  • Have been told that you have inhibitors to von Willebrand factor (because VONVENDI may not work for you).
  • Have been told that you have inhibitors to blood coagulation factor VIII.

What else should I know about VONVENDI and von Willebrand Disease?

Your body can form inhibitors to von Willebrand factor or factor VIII. An inhibitor is part of the body's normal defense system. If you form inhibitors, it may stop VONVENDI or factor VIII from working properly. Consult with your healthcare provider to make sure you are carefully monitored with blood tests for the development of inhibitors to von Willebrand factor or factor VIII.

What are the possible side effects of VONVENDI?

You can have an allergic reaction to VONVENDI.

Call your healthcare provider right away and stop treatment if you get a rash or hives, itching, tightness of the throat, chest pain or tightness, difficulty breathing, lightheadedness, dizziness, nausea or fainting.

Side effects that have been reported with VONVENDI include: nausea, vomiting, tingling or burning at infusion site, chest discomfort, dizziness, hot flashes, itching, high blood pressure, muscle twitching, unusual taste, blood clots and increased heart rate.

Tell your healthcare provider about any side effects that bother you or do not go away.

Please click here for VONVENDI full Prescribing Information.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit https://www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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